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  • Yad Vashem Studies

    Volume 46

    Arkadi Zeltser

    Yad Vashem Studies is an academic journal featuring articles on the cutting edge of research and reflection on the Holocaust. Yad Vashem Studies is a must for any serious library seeking to offer the essential texts on the Nazi era and the Holocaust. “Yad Vashem Studies has been at the forefront of research into the Nazi persecution and mass murder of the Jews, its origins and its consequences… indispensable for researchers and teachers alike. David Silberklang, as editor, has displayed a remarkable talent for balancing the output of grizzled veterans with the challenging findings of younger researchers… No library that purports to offer students and teachers the essential historical texts on the Nazi era and the fate of the Jews can afford to be without Yad Vashem Studies.” [David Cesarani, The Journal of Holocaust Education]; Beginning with volume 35, Yad Vashem Studies comes out twice annually, in spring and fall, making our contributors’ important research available to our readers more quickly and more readily. We have also redone our layout in order to make it more reader friendly. Our rigorous high standards remain unchanged. Table of Contents: Introduction; David S. Wyman: A Scholar Who Turned a Field on Its Head (Deborah E. Lipstadt(; “You’ll Yet Tell the World What These Eternal Miscreants Did”: On Aharon Appelfeld’s Art on the First Anniversary of His Passing (Yehudit Winograd(; Salonican Jews in Auschwitz: Sephardi Language, History, and Memory (Robin Buller(; Tracing Their Steps: Symbolic Topography and Anti-Jewish Politics in Budapest (Zoltán Kékesi(; German Consul Fritz Schellhorn’s Interventions on Behalf of Jews in Czernowitz (Hartwig Cremers(; Competitive Cooperation: The Society for the Protection of Science and Learning, the American Emergency Committee, and the Placement of Refugee Scholars in North America (David Zimmerman); Reviews: The Final Battle of Warsaw’s Jews: Review of Havi Dreifuss, Geto Varsha – HaSof: April 1942 – June 1943 (Hebrew) (Avinoam Patt); Arnošt Frischer: Dilemmas of Zionist Diaspora Politics under the Shadow of the Holocaust: Review of Jan Láníček, Arnošt Frischer and the Jewish Politics of Early 20th-Century Europe (Michal Frankl); The Prisoner Community in the Nazi Model Ghetto: Review of H. G. Adler, Theresienstadt 1941–1945: The Face of a Coerced Community (Jan Láníček); Work in Progress: Review of Yvonne Kozlovsky Golan, Forgotten from the Frame: The Absence of the Holocaust Experiences of Mizrahim from the Visual Arts and Media in Israel (Hebrew) (Omer Bartov);

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  • Unwelcome Memory

    Arkadi Zeltser

    The book examines the connection between the memory of the Holocaust in the USSR and the ethnic identity of Soviet Jews, and describes the grassroots activities of thousands of Jews, banded together in more than 700 separate groups, to memorialize their loved ones murdered by the Nazis. Hundreds of the monuments that they managed to establish included clear ethnic-religious inscriptions in Hebrew, Yiddish, and Russian, as well as Jewish symbols. Learn More

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  • Yad Vashem Studies

    Volume 46

    David Silberklang

    Yad Vashem Studies is an academic journal featuring articles on the cutting edge of research and reflection on the Holocaust. Yad Vashem Studies is a must for any serious library seeking to offer the essential texts on the Nazi era and the Holocaust. “Yad Vashem Studies has been at the forefront of research into the Nazi persecution and mass murder of the Jews, its origins and its consequences… indispensable for researchers and teachers alike. David Silberklang, as editor, has displayed a remarkable talent for balancing the output of grizzled veterans with the challenging findings of younger researchers… No library that purports to offer students and teachers the essential historical texts on the Nazi era and the fate of the Jews can afford to be without Yad Vashem Studies.” [David Cesarani, The Journal of Holocaust Education]. Beginning with volume 35, Yad Vashem Studies comes out twice annually, in spring and fall, making our contributors’ important research available to our readers more quickly and more readily. We have also redone our layout in order to make it more reader friendly. Our rigorous high standards remain unchanged. Table of Contents: Introduction; Envisioning Poles: Polish-Jewish Relations at the Beginning of the German Occupation (Monika Rice); Seeking Relative Safety: The Flight of Polish Jews to the East in the Autumn of 1939 (Eliyana R. Adler and Natalia Aleksiun); On the So-called “Diamant Network”: The Activities of Jewish Undercover Agents in Occupied Krakow in Relation to the Polish Underground (Alicja Jarkowska-Natkaniec); “The children are in a state of true panic”: Postwar Anti-Jewish Violence in Podhale and Its Youngest Victims (Karolina Panz); Raul Hilberg and the Angst about the “Whole Truth”: A Case Study on the Work of German Zeitgeschichte (Götz Aly); Reviews: A New Reading of the Rebbe of Piaseczno’s Holocaust-era Sermons: Review of Rabbi Kalonymus Kalmish Shapira, Derashot mi-shnot ha-za’am: Derashot ha-admor mi-Piaseczno be-geto Varsha, tash-tashab (Hebrew), Daniel Reiser, ed. (Moria Herman); Depicting the Holocaust in the General Government of Poland: Review of Martin Winstone, The Dark Heart of Hitler’s Europe: Nazi Rule in Poland under the General Government; Dariusz Libionka, Zagłada Żydów w Generalnym Gubernatorstwie. Zarys problematiki (Stephan Lehnstaedt); “Ghost Citizens” in Radom – Return to a Postwar Town: Review of Łukasz Krzyżanowski, Dom, którego nie było: powroty ocalałych do powojennego miasta (Anna Cichopek-Gajraj); One Church’s Moral Failure: Review of Ion Popa, The Romanian Orthodox Church and the Holocaust (Vladimir Solonari) Learn More

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  • The Jewish Voice in the Ghettos and Concentration Camps

    Yisrael Kaplan

    Zeev W. Mankowitz

    How many words did the Jews have for “bread” and “hunger” during the Holocaust? How many different expressions did they coin to describe their “dreams” and “hopes”? As early as December 1945, Yisrael Kaplan (1902–2003) – an established historian and literary essayist, and editor of Fun Letstn Khurbn, the Yiddish journal published by the Central Historical Commission in the immediate aftermath of the war – circulated among survivors a questionnaire on ethnographic-linguistic topics. This was one aspect of the Commission’s endeavor to provide historians with insight into the inner lives of the Jews in Nazi-controlled Europe. Kaplan’s main goal was to document for posterity the vast popular cultural activity that flourished in Nazi Europe, despite the increasing persecution and annihilation of the Jews. This volume is a unique collection of poems, jokes, popular expressions, proverbs, slogans, common curses, secret codes, and more that were devised by Jews in the camps and ghettos as a way of coping with the harsh reality. The terms and sayings reflect the Jews’ attitudes toward the Nazi oppressors and their collaborators and demonstrate the resilience of the Jewish spirit against all odds. Learn More

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  • Search & Research, Lectures and Papers 28

    Dan Michman

    With the aggravation of the Middle East Conflict since the 1990s, the legacy of the history of the Holocaust and its repercussions for relations in this region have been of increasing interest to both scholars and politicians. This study analyzes the current state of research regarding the development of Nazi anti-Jewish policies in general, and the decision-making process that led to the Final Solution in particular (including the role of the Wannsee Conference). It also clarifies the nature of the relations between the Mufti and Nazi Germany, and provides a detailed description of the conversation between Hitler and the Mufti on November 28, 1941. A series of the most important relevant documents are included in the appendix. Learn More

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  • Hiding, Sheltering and Borrowing Identities

    Dan Michman

    During the immediate aftermath of the Holocaust, the focus of research was directed at the actions of the murderers and at resistance. That situation changed gradually during the 1960s and 1970s. The rescue of Jews, a major aspect of Holocaust history, started to attract the attention of scholars. Still, the focus was mostly on governments and organizations. The initiation of Yad Vashem's recognition program for the Righteous Among the Nations also drew public attention to the acts of individual rescuers in areas under Nazi control. Over the course of the last three decades, important studies have been published that investigated the rescuers and their acts. Yet even today, many aspects of the rescue activities require further research. Moreover, the aspect of Jewish initiatives and individual experiences deserves more attention. Yad Vashem's eighteenth biannual conference, titled ''Hiding, Sheltering and Borrowing Identities as Avenues of Rescue during the Holocaust,'' brought together a large number of international scholars to discuss new approaches and the current state of research on the topic. This volume, based on a selection of papers that were presented at the conference, aims to provide an overview of the multi-faceted landscape of academic studies on the rescuers and the rescued. Learn More

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  • The End of 1942

    Dan Michman, Dina Porat and Haim Saadoun

    During the second half of 1942, several events signaled a shift on the fronts of World War II. The failed German summer offensive on the Eastern Front led to the encirclement of the Sixth Army in Stalingrad. In Northern Africa, Operation Torch marked the prelude to the defeat of the German Africa Corps. Since 1941, information had begun to trickle out about the German mass murder program in the occupied territories. The first counteroffensives of the Red Army had led to an initial understanding of the scope of the killings, but additional, reliable sources like the Riegner Telegram provided important details and indicated the shift to the industrial extermination of the Final Solution. As a result, the Allies and Jewish organizations published their first official statements that addressed the German murder operations. The Allies' position and their response to the growing evidence of genocidal action remains a matter of debate among historians. Could the leaders of the Allied nations have understood the magnitude of the Final Solution sooner? Were they in a situation that would have allowed them to invest more resources to rescue its Jewish victims? Yad Vashem's nineteenth biannual international conference gathered scholars from fifteen countries to discuss these questions from a wide variety of angles. This volume, edited by senior historians Dina Porat and Dan Michman, includes selected articles by contributing researchers with the aim to provide new insights and answers into the developments that unfolded during that critical phase of the war. Learn More

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  • A Different Story

    Emilie Roi

    There were eight children in the family, and Maya (Emilie( was the youngest. The family had lived in Denmark for many generations, and they were the only Jews in a small, sleepy village outside Copenhagen. Maya tells us about her life at home and in the fairytale garden, about her brothers and sisters, granny and nanny, and even the chimney sweep. Then World War Two breaks out, and Maya’s story becomes the marvelous tale of the rescue of Denmark’s Jews, and their escape to Sweden. We follow Maya and her family on the dangerous voyage across the sea, and stay with them in Sweden until the end of the war. More than 70 years have passed since that wondrous escape, and many children, as well as adults, have never heard of it. They have heard about the Holocaust and its horrors, but not about how one single country decided it would not abandon its Jewish citizens to their fate. And that is what makes this story so moving-and so different. Emilie Roi was born in Denmark. In October 1943, at the age of seven, she and her family fled the Germans in a fishing boat to neutral Sweden. After the war, they returned to Denmark. This book tells her story. Learn More

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  • I Am Writing These Words To You

    Chajka Klinger

    Avihu Ronen

    I Am Writing These Words to You reveals Chajka Klingers’ soul-searching response to the existential conflicts that plagued her while writing her diaries. Still in the grip of the nightmare of the last deportation, of torture by the Gestapo, and of the death of her comrades, she had no idea if anyone would read her words. Chajka Klinger (1917–1958), who was born into a Hasidic family, joined Hashomer Hatzair and became a major activist in the Jewish Fighting Organization (ŻOB) in Będzin. She was chosen by her comrades to survive and to document their history to ensure their memory. “Condemned to live,” she fulfilled her obligation to them by writing her diaries in hiding in 1943. Chajka Klinger’s diaries are among the earliest comprehensive documents to reach the Jewish public outside of occupied Poland during the war. The notebooks provide a window into the activities of the Jewish youth movements during the Holocaust, and convey vastly important information about the ŻOB in Będzin and in Warsaw, the relationships between the underground organizations and the Judenrat, the response of the Jewish public to the extermination, and about Mordechai Anielewicz. They are also a primary source of information about the battles in the ghettos. In March 1944, Chajka immigrated to Eretz Israel, where she attempted to rebuild her life on Kibbutz Haogen, but despite her tenacious efforts, her strength gave out in April 1958, and on the fifteenth anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising, she put an end to her life. Her diaries were published posthumously in a shortened and censored edition. Published in full for the first time, this volume contains the English translation of the original diaries. Chajka’s son Prof. Avihu Ronen edited the volume and provided an introduction and annotations that shed light on the circumstances under which Chajka Klinger wrote, and offer a greater understanding of her fate and that of her underground comrades. Learn More

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  • Relations Between Jews and Poles

    Havi Dreifuss (Ben-Sasson)

    As far as Polish‒Jewish relations are concerned, we need to devote at least a few words to the attitude of Jews toward the Poles.… even in their suffering, the Jews remember with deep emotion and gratefulness all the acts of kindness toward them and the helping hand extended to them by each of those Poles.… But, despite this, the insult and humiliation—which shall never be forgotten—no one wishes to remember. (Anonymous, Warsaw Ghetto, 1942). The issue of relations between Jews and Poles during the Holocaust is one of the most complex and emotionally-charged subjects in the research of that era. However, compared to the abundance of studies dealing with the question of the Poles’ involvement in the persecution of the Jews, and the Poles’ responses to the mass murder perpetrated by the Germans on Polish land, very little has been written about how the Jews perceived their Polish milieu during the Holocaust. In her book, Relations between Jews and Poles during the Holocaust: The Jewish Perspective, Professor Havi Dreifuss (Ben-Sasson) traces the changes in how the Polish Jews perceived their environment. Did the Jews of Poland consider their land of birth a partner in the German persecution, or did they view Poland as yet another victim of the murderous Nazi intent? When and why did the prevalent sense of brotherhood that existed at the start of the war end, only to be replaced by harsh feelings of alienation and animosity? What did the Jews write about their Polish neighbors, and in what way did the Jews’ social standing influence their perception of their surroundings? How did the German policy influence the relations that were formed between the Poles and the Jews in occupied Poland? The extensive documentary material upon which Dreifuss based her research—dozens of diaries and hundreds of documents from archives in Israel and abroad—bears testimony to the fact that even under the Nazi regime, which attempted to cut off the Jews from their surroundings, Jews persisted in their contacts—both real and imagined—with Polish society, and constantly attempted to reevaluate the world around them. The diaries and documents portray the Polish Jews’ conscious awareness of their environment, expose a glimpse of the realities of life in Poland, and cast light on several of the factors that directly and indirectly influenced their lives, and ultimately their deaths. Learn More

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