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  • Fate and Destiny

    Joseph B. Soloveitchik

    One of the classics of modern Jewish thought, Kol Dodi Dofek is now translated in English and titled Fate and Destiny: From the Holocaust to the State of Israel. Rabbi Soloveitchik presents an extended theological meditation on the Holocaust and the rise of the State of Israel, a profound examination of the Jewish "covenant of faith" and the "covenant of fate and destiny" which links all Jews, religious, irreligious and non-religious.
    This covenant of faith manifests itself in shared circumstances, shared responsibility and shared activity. Fate and destiny likewise links all Jews, but while fate is thrust upon the Jews, destiny is freely chosen by the individual Jew and the Jewish people by adopting a Torah lifestyle and possesses both significance and purpose.

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  • Shiurei Harav

    Joseph B. Soloveitchik

    Joseph Epstein

    The editors of Hamevaser, Yeshiva University's Torah student monthly (now defunct), recognized the growing thirst for the late Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik's teachings. In response, they published the original version of this conspectus, containing the first English version of the Rav's Hebrew and Yiddish discourses, with summaries of his shiurim and lectures. This volume substantially builds on that achievement, bringing together nineteen of the Rav's most illuminating works not published elsewhere. Subjects include "The Ten Commandments," "Adam and Eve," "The Unique Experience of Judaism," and "On the Love of Torah." Learn More
  • Why Jews do What They Do

    The History of Jewish Customs Throughout the Cycle of the Jewish Year(Translated edition from the Hebrew) Learn More
  • Pirke Avot, Wisdom of the Sages

    Chaim Stern

    The late Rabbi Stern's translation and commentary is new and gender neutral. It reflects the approach of traditional modern thinkers on Avot. Learn More
  • Midrash Tanhuma #

    Midrash Tanhuma Vol. 1

    Volume 1 Genesis

    John T. Townsend

    Just over a century ago, Solomon Buber published a new version of the Tanhuma based on an Oxford manuscript which is substantially different from the more common printed versions. It is this version or one very close to it which Rashi had before him and whose interpretations he often commends and recommends. Despite its importance and appeal, no version of Midrash Tanhuma has ever been translated into English.
    Tanhuma is one of the jewels of midrash literature As one of the Yelammedenu midrashim, it is less diffuse than Genesis Rabbah, its units are shorter than those of the Pesiktas. It thus strikes a balance between what may appear to the reader as a humble of the one and long sermons of the other.

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  • Midrash Tanhuma #

    Midrash Tanhuma Vol. 3

    Volume 3 Numbers and Deuteronomy

    John T. Townsend

    Just over a century ago, Solomon Buber published a new version of the Tanhuma based on an Oxford manuscript which is substantially different from the more common printed versions. It is this version or one very close to it which Rashi had before him and whose interpretations he often commends and recommends. Despite its importance and appeal, no version of Midrash Tanhuma has ever been translated into English.
    Tanhuma is one of the jewels of midrash literature As one of the Yelammedenu midrashim, it is less diffuse than Genesis Rabbah, its units are shorter than those of the Pesiktas. It thus strikes a balance between what may appear to the reader as a humble of the one and long sermons of the other.

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  • The Jews of Kaifeng China

    Xu Xin

    From the ninth century on, there was an indigenous Jewish community in the city of Kaifeng in northeastern China. Separated by thousands of miles from the rest of the world, and largely cut off from contact with the main centers of Jewish life, the Kaifeng Jews developed a distinctive culture that was unquestionably Jewish but progressively absorbed Chinese elements. Their greatest problem was not separation from other Jews so much as the openness and tolerance of Chinese society. Intermarriages occurred frequently, and Jews were fully accepted as merchants, government officials, and neighbors. Over time, they were so completely assimilated that few of their descendants carry any memory of Jewish ancestry and physically look much like other Chinese. The story of the Kaifeng Jews is dramatic and colorful, and offers many profound lessons. It will be indispensable to anyone interested in Jewish or Chinese history.

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  • Ashkenazim and Sephardim

    H.J. Zimmels

    Reflections on the differences, relations and problems between Ashkenazim and Sephardim, as seen through rabbinic responsa. Learn More
  • The Response of Orthodox Jewry in the United States to the Holocaust

    Efraim Zuroff

    When hundreds of Polish rabbis and yeshiva students were forced to flee to Lithuania in the wake of the outbreak of World War II and the Soviet invasion of Poland, Orthodox rabbis in the United States responded by establishing a special rescue committee on their behalf called the Emergency Committee for War-Torn Yeshivoth. This committee, which later became known (by its Hebrew name) as the Vaad-ha-Hatzala Rescue Committee emerged as the official rescue and relief agency of American Orthodox Jewry during the Holocaust.
    This book records the history of the Vaad-ha-Hatzala, which initially focused exclusively on the rescue of rabbis and yeshiva students, but later expanded its efforts to include all Jews threatened by the Nazis regardless of their religiosity or affiliation. During World War II, the Vaad was able to help rescue hundreds of refugee Torah scholars, most of whom escaped to safety via the Far East, as well as thousands of Jews in Nazi-occupied Europe. The help provided by the Vaad also enabled hundreds of refugee rabbis and yeshiva students to continue intensive Torah studies and maintain their unique life-style.
    The establishment of The Vaad-ha-Hatzala in November 1939 aroused considerable controversy in the American Jewish community, because it violated the organizational unity for fundraising purposes which had been achieved for the first time ever ten months previously. The Vaad's initial insistence on rescuing only rabbis and yeshiva students was also a source of conflict within American Jewry. These problems were clearly reflected in the problematic relations between the Vaad-ha-Hatzala and the Joint Distribution Committee and local federations throughout the United States. The difficult dilemmas faced by the leaders of American Jewry and the bitter controversies regarding the rescue efforts are major focus of this study.
    This is the first scholarly work which explains how leading Orthodox rabbis made policy decisions on such issues as rescue priority and the attitude towards US rules and regulations which in their opinion were detrimental to their rescue initiatives. The work fully documents the struggles between the various American Jewish rescue agencies over the hearts and pockets of the members of the community and how these battles affected rescue activities. It also describes the role played by Orthodox groups in the efforts to unite American Jewry in the wake of the publication of the news regarding the Final Solution and explains why the Orthodox rabbis ultimately preferred to conduct an independent rescue policy rather than cooperating with the veteran American Jewish establishment.
    Based primarily on heretofore unpublished documents from the archives of the Vaad, which are based in Yeshiva University, this book is the first scholarly account and analysis of American Orthodoxy's rescue efforts during the Holocaust-the successes, the failures, the bitter internal debates within the community, the anguish and recriminations in the wake of the realization of the Final Solution-on the background of the response of American Jewry and US rescue policy during World War II.
    Dr. Efraim Zuroff is one of the leading Israeli scholars and commentators on the Holocaust.
    A native of New York, he completed his undergraduate studies in history at Yeshiva College and obtained his master's and Ph.D. in Holocaust Studies at the Institute of Contemporary Jewry of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The author of close to one hundred articles on the destruction of European Jewry and its contemporary implications, Zuroff is currently the director of the Israel office of the Simon Wiesenthal Center and the coordinator of the Center's Nazi war crimes research worldwide. Among his previous works are Occupation Nazi Hunter:The Continuing Search for the Perpetrators of the Holocaust (KTAV) and (as editor) Rescue Attempts During the Holocaust (Yad Vashem) Learn More

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