Call 201-963-9524 / 718-972-5449   Fax 718-972-6307

    Shlomo Riskin

picture of Rabbi Shlomo Riskin  

Rabbi Shlomo Riskin was born in Brooklyn and studied at the Yeshiva of Brooklyn. He received rabbinic ordination from Rabbi Soloveitchik of Yeshiva University. Rabbi Riskin also holds a Master Degree in Jewish History and a PhD from New York University.

At the age of 23, Rabbi Riskin became the founding rabbi of the Lincoln Square synagogue in New York. He was able to transfer the fledgling Conservative congregation into a vibrant Orthodox community with an extremely successful outreach program.

During the '60s and '70s, Riskin became a leader in the fight for the freedom of Soviet Jewry, and was the chairman of the Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry. 

In 1983, Rabbi Riskin made Aliya to Efrat with his family, where he became and continues to be its chief Rabbi. Many of his former congregants followed him to Efrat over the years. In Israel, he has established many schools and institutions under the umbrella organization, Ohr Torah Stone. Students number in the thousands. 

He has been a pioneer of Jewish women's rights in the Orthodox world, and co-founded Midreshet Lindenbaum, a seminary for Orthodox women. He has also worked within Israeli society to further the rights of women, especially in the rabbinic sphere.




 

4 Item(s)

Set Ascending Direction
per page

Grid  List 

  • The Passover Haggadah

    Shlomo Riskin

    Rabbi Riskin, founding rabbi of the Lincoln Square Synagogue, regards the Haggadah as more than a handbook of liturgy and instructions for conducting a seder; he sees it as a vital and accessible source for understanding some of the fundamental themes of Jewish spirituality. In analyzing the Haggadah from this perspective, he fully explains the religious significance of Passover both as a reenactment of the Jewish past and as a window to the Jewish future.
    This Haggadah is out-of-the-ordinary in still another sense. It did not start out in a libary or study hall with a pencil and paper in hand. It began as collection of lectures which Rabbi Riskin gave at several model Seders at Lincoln Square Synagogue. The oral rather than literary genesis allows a more personal touch. Arranged as a series of mini-lectures, each one appropriate to its related text, this Haggadah speaks directly to you, the reader. Reading it is very much like attending Rabbi Riskin's own Seder.
    About the Author
    Rabbi Shlomo Riskin is the founding rabbi of the Lincoln Square Synagogue in New York City. he is considered one of the foremost spokesmen of modern Orthodox Judaism. Rabbi Riskin is founder and dean of the Ohr Torah Institute, a rabbinical seminary and high school. He is particularly noted for reaching out to unaffiliated and searching Jews and has established the Institute for Jewish Experience in Bedford, New York, to provide a Sabbath experience and week-long seminars. Learn More
  • Women and Jewish Divorce

    Shlomo Riskin

    Rabbi Shlomo Riskin gives an insightful view of this extremely relevant topic for our generation. The book explores many aspects of Jewish law relating to divorce and women's rights. Learn More
  • Jewish Woman’s Right to Divorce

    Shlomo Riskin

    Can women faced with an intolerable marital situation initiate divorce in Jewish law? Not for the last seven centuries. But this was not always so, and in this trailblazing book Rabbi Riskin argues that there are ways in which women can start divorce proceedings.
    In early Talmudic times, a woman who refused to participate in marital relations because of pique was the subject of increasingly harsh rabbinic legislation. In late Amoraic and medieval times, the focus of debate shifted. If the wife claimed that her husband evoked feelings of repulsion in her, the major Talmudic opinion was that the rabbinical court should coerce the husband to divorce his wife. The early Geonim even insisted that the wife receive her complete alimony as provided by the marriage contract.
    After the twelfth century and under the influence of Rabbenu Tam, most authorities rejected this solution. Concern was centered on preserving the family and although the Talmud itself accepts a nullification of a marriage when the husband behaves in a negative or manipulative manner, the majority of halakhic decisors rejected this view.
    Nevertheless, there were always a minority of instances in which the Rabbenu Tam was overruled and even when marriages were annulled. Unfortunately, most Religious Courts today follow the most stringent opinion.
    The thesis of this work is that since the Talmud itself urged leniency in cases where women found themselves chained to an intolerable marital situation, it is incumbent upon the Religious Courts today to utilize the means provided by Jewish law to provide a solution for the plight of those women refused a divorce by recalcitrant husbands. In an appendix, Rabbi Riskin presents a premarital agreement designed to prevent a woman from being unfairly held hostage.

    About the Author
    Rabbi Riskin is the Chief Rabbi of Efrat, the Chancellor of Ohr Torah Stone Colleges, Graduate Programs and Rabbinical Seminary and is the founding rabbi of Lincoln Square Synagogue. He is also the author of Torah Lights, a contemporary commentary on the books of Genesis and Exodus, a commentary on The Passover Haggadah, and Around the Family Table. Learn More
  • Women and Men in Communal Prayer

    Daniel Sperber, Mendel Shapiro, Eliav Shochetman and Shlomo Riskin

    Chaim Trachtman

    3 Review(s)

    Communal prayer has always been a central component in Jewish
    life. Traditional orthodox services are structured around spatial and
    functional separation of men and women. In this book, introduced by Dr. Tamar
    Ross, Rabbi Daniel Sperber presents a halakhic justification for expanding the
    role of women in communal prayer services. Building on work by Rabbi Mendel
    Shapiro (included in the volume) in which the legal sources are examined and
    interpreted to permit women to lead parts of the service and participate in Torah
    reading, Rabbi Sperber highlights the pivotal importance of kevod ha-beri'ot
    (human dignity) in encouraging fuller participation of women in communal
    prayer. Because of the relevance and timeliness of the topic, two articles that
    express opposition to Rabbi Sperber's position are included- one by Rabbi
    Shlomo Riskin and one by Professor Eliav Shochetman. This anthology represents
    an example of a vibrant dialogue between leading scholars on a current issue and
    highlights the dynamic nature of the halakhic process.



    Learn More

4 Item(s)

Set Ascending Direction
per page

Grid  List